Free Golf Handicap Calculator Tool

Free Golf Handicap Calculator

Golf Handicap Calculator

To figure out your handicap score, enter in your 5 most recent 18-hole golf scores above. Our tool will calculate your individual round handicap (HCP) and your overall golfer handicap.

To figure out your course rating and slope rating, you can use the USGA National database. More information about how to do this is below!

How Does our Golf Handicap Calculator Work?

A golf handicap calculator automatically performs your handicap calculation so that you you know what expected score you have. In order to use the calculator, you must enter in your recent golf scores, the course rating, and the course slope into the table above. The calculator automatically gives you your golf handicap score.

A lower handicap score indicates that the total number of strokes you take in a round of golf will be less than those with a higher score. The formula, which we get into below, takes into account the course’s difficulty, course’s par, and skill level of the player.

This calculator gives you your golf handicap net score – your score after your handicap is subtracted from your actual gross score.

What is Golf Handicap?

A golf handicap is an adjusted numerical value that tells you how many shots over par you are expected to hit in a round of golf. The handicap takes into account each golf course so that a difficult course can be compared side by side with an easy one. The golf handicap is a measure of a player’s golf ability.

The handicap score is designed to allow an average golfer and a professional golfer to play on an even playing field, by allowing the average golfer to adjust their score for their handicap. The formula is an average so that your best scores don’t artificially change your number. You should use your most recent round in your formula so that your number represents your current level of play.

The World Handicap System is a governing that developed the formula for golf handicap and also administers the course rating and slope rating of each course. These variables are important in order to calculate an accurate playing handicap.

How to Determine Your Golf Handicap

To determine your own golf handicap score, you need to know the formula to plug your numbers into. The official golf handicap formula is:

Golf Handicap = Handicap Index X (Slope Rating / 113) + (Course Rating – Par)

This formula was just overhauled in 2020 in order to provide a more accurate handicap for players. The new formula takes into account those golfers who play from a different specific set of tees and have adjusted yardage and course par.

Most players and events round your handicap to the nearest whole number

Handicap Differential

Another term that is regularly used is your golf handicap differential. This is the difference between your adjusted gross score and the official United States Golf Association (USGA) rating of the course after it is adjusted for the slope rating.

Differential has the following formula:

Handicap Differential = (Score – Course Rating) x 113 / Slope Rating

Players with the lowest differentials (or negative) are known as better golfers.

Handicap Maximum Score

Once you have an established handicap index, then one of the nuances about the system is that in official competition, you have a maximum hole score you can apply. The maximum is equal to net double bogey, which is the hole double bogey, plus the number of handicap strokes you are entitled to for each hole.

This net double bogey replaces the old equitable stroke control number that used to be used before 2020.

To figure out the maximum score you can get per hole:

You get a handicap stroke for each of the hardest holes up until you reach your handicap. So if your handicap is 15, then you get a stroke on the hardest 15 holes on the course. For these holes you could score a triple bogey (double plus one) and for the easiest 3 holes you could score a double bogey.

If you have a handicap score of 25, then you can score a quadruple bogey on the hardest 7 holes and a triple bogey on the remaining 11 holes.

The score you receive after applying your handicap is called your adjusted score.

If you don’t play in official tour events, then you don’t need to know too much about the rules of handicapping.

Components to a Golf Handicap

18 Hole Score

Your 18-hole score is the actual gross score that you had after your round at the golf club. When you are trying to calculate your handicap, you have to watch and track your recent scores and input them into the golf handicap calculator.

Course Rating

The course rating is a measure of the difficulty of a golf course for scratch golfers. If a golf course has a par of 72 and a rating of 68, then the world’s best golfers would be expected to score 68 on a round of golf at the course. If the course rating is higher than its par, then even the best golfers in the world would be expected to shoot above par. This rating is unique for different golf courses.

Course Slope

The course slope rating is an indication of the relative difficulty of a specific course between a scratch golfer (handicap index of 0) and a bogey golfer.

The lower course slope rating is 55 and the highest is 155. The higher the number, the more difficult the golf course is. The slope of the course is calculated using a fancy formula that takes into account the average hitting distance for a scratch golfer and looks at what hazards are in play during a regular round of golf. The course slope takes into account the difficulty of the course no matter which tee you hit from.

All of these factors are used in the official USGA formula determine golf handicap.

How to Determine Course Rating and Course Slope

USGA Course rating and course slope are calculations that are unique for each particular course. They are difficulty factors that adjust your USGA handicap for the difficulty of the course that you played.

To find out a rating and slope for a specific golf course, check out the USGA National Course Rating database. Here, you can search for different courses located all around the world.

From the list of search results, click on your particular golf course.

In the final screen, the USGA database shows you the course rating for par and bogey, and slope rating for each tee and gender. You take the resulting number from this screen and input them into the golf handicap calculator above.

Other Important Definitions

While you are here learning about handicap, the game of golf has other related definitions you should learn.

Handicap Index

Some websites will show you handicap and handicap index, so what is the difference? While technically the same thing, a handicap index is the score that is generated from official scores submitted into the governing body handicap system – USGA in the United states and Golf Canada in Canada. The golf handicap calculator in this post is not binding with the USGA. To be an official handicap index score, make sure you submit them to your governing body.

Scratch Golfer

Scratch golfer is the term used to describer a player with a handicap index score of 0.0. This means that under normal playing conditions and gameplay, you would be expected to score even par every 18 holes. For a lot of casual players, becoming a scratch player is a lifelong goal and dream.

Being a scratch golfer means that you would have the skill level to place high in amateur and local tournaments.

Bogey Golfer

A bogey golfer is the term for a player who has an average handicap score of 20.0 for men and 24.0 for women. This means that on any given day, you are likely to score one over par on average per whole. On a standard par 72 golf course, this will equate to a 9-hole score of 46 and 18-hole scores of 92.

A lot of casual golfers play bogey golf and the average score for a golfer around the world is 96, which is slightly worse than bogey golf.

Handicap Allowance

A handicap allowance is an extra percentage variable in the calculation that gets added in official competitions. The allowance prevents golfers with different handicaps to gain an unfair advantage over others. It is applied differently by round type so that stroke play, match play, and other types can be compared.

The following table outlines the recommended allowances based on medium-sized field net events:

Format of PlayType of RoundRecommended Handicap Allowant
Stroke PlayIndividual95%
Stroke PlayIndividual Stableford95%
Stroke PlayIndividual Par/Bogey95%
Stroke PlayIndividual Maximum Score95%
Stroke PlayFour-Ball85%
Stroke PlayFour-Ball Stableford85%
Stroke PlayFour-Ball Par/Bogey90%
Match PlayIndividual100%
Match PlayFour-Ball90%
OtherFoursomes50% of combined team handicap
OtherGreensomes60% low handicap + 40% high handicap
OtherPinehurst/Chapman60% low handicap + 40% high handicap
OtherBest 1 of 4 stroke play75%
OtherBest 2 of 4 stroke play85%
OtherBest 3 of 4 stroke play100%
OtherAll 4 of 4 stroke play100%
OtherScramble (4 players)25%/20%/15%/10% from the lowest to highest handicap
OtherScramble (2 players)35% low/15% high
OtherTotal score of 2 match play100%
OtherBest 1 of 4 Par/Bogey75%
OtherBest 1 of 4 Par/Bogey80%
OtherBest 2 of 4 Par/Bogey90%
OtherBest 3 of 4 Par/Bogey100%
OtherBest 4 of 4 Par/Bogey

The handicap allowance is a percentage, which allows it to be applied to both a 9-hole course or 18-hole course.

Conclusion

The golf handicap calculator above will help you figure out your handicap index on the course. To use it, you simply enter in 5 or more recent scores. The calculator figures out your golf handicap.

In order to get an accurate number, you need to know your course’s difficulty and slope rating. This can be found in the USGA national database, who is the overall governing body of golf.

Once you know what your handicap score is, you can also figure our your handicap differential and handicap maximum score. These tools are more important for tournament and competition play.

Your golf handicap is mostly informational only, but a lot of golfers take interested in it. This is especially true as you become close to a scratch golfer.

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